sinnesspiel: (Default)
Links to Chapters

12 - 1
12 - 2
12 - 3
12 - 4

No cultural notes this chapter.

I'm starting on a translation glossary of names. I'll try not to miss any characters, but if any astute readers happen to notice that a character physically appears in a chapter and the chapter isn't tagged with their name let me know. I'm not counting non-Shiki unmoving or non-responsive corpses as "appearing," so for example the chapter where Ozaki examines Gotouda Fuki's body isn't tagged with her, but the portions where Kyouko is responsive (brain waves, blistering in the sunlight) are tagged for her. 

I'm also collecting mention-only characters and links to where they're mentioned.

Example: Gotouda Kyouko, daughter of Gotouda Kumi, never makes an appearance directly but is mentioned as existing in 3-2-4.
Example 2: an unnamed man from the Ebata family (none of whom ever appear directly) is mentioned in 1-1-4. Even if his first name isn't given, there is a family name to translate.

A lot of these one-time wonders are easy to miss. If you're rereading old chapters and come across someone you think I may have missed feel free to comment either in that chapter itself or on the family tree page or here with who the character is and where they're mentioned. A good sign I've missed them is that they're not listed on the Family Tree page; I've tried to scope ahead for characters not yet even mentioned (I don't think Hirosawa Takafumi's been mentioned yet but I know he works at the town hall at some point later), but I still find some and add them as I go. 
sinnesspiel: (Default)
Links to Chapters

11 - 1
11 - 2
11 - 3
11 - 4
11 - 5
11 - 6

Cultural Notes

11 - 3

 The Japanese Agricultural Cooperative (JA)
- The JA is, in short, a government agency that lobbies for Japanese farmers and promotes their interests in government affairs. Examples include imports and overseeing standards and regulations for almost all farming enterprises, including real estate, insurance, machinery, taxes, etc. 

 In the 1900s Japan underwent several major governmental and ideological shifts, with departments merging, being terminated or reformed. During World War II, the current JA was reformed from the ashes of previous institutions overseeing agricultural coops and Kous (Japanese RoSCAs) in order to regulate agriculture during food shortages. This was to prevent sales of food products on the black market during the period of shortage. After the war, JA policies were generally conservative and subsidies and taxes alike made it cheaper for many to grow their own food rather than purchase it. This lead to many continuing to be farmers even if only on weekends with another full time job. These small scale farmers would often sell their land and keep only a small farming lot for their individual household. Still farmers and involved in the JA, these families proceeds frequently remain in JA bank accounts, which are then reinvested and used by the JA.

During the timeframe of Shiki (1994), the JA is a part of the Japanese National Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, though as of 2002 it was reclassified as a Special Civilian Corporation.  During the time of Shiki, the JA had the authority to audit agricultural coops and to collect dues and fees from members of these coops. 

The JA bank functions much like any other bank system, with investments, savings and loans. As of 2012, the JA Bank was the second largest megabank in Japan, with ¥88 trillion.

Profile

sinnesspiel: (Default)
Sinnesspiel

January 2016

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 25th, 2017 04:41 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios